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28/07/2021

You can now live chat with an agent directly through the Bankstone website.
At any time you can elevate this chat to a phone call, without cost.


Change of ownership

01/07/2021

The directors of Thorneycrofts, part of TS Group, and Bankstone are pleased to announce jointly that Bankstone’s Dickon Tysoe has purchased the entire share capital of Bankstone. The two businesses will continue to have a very close working relationship in future.

Thorneycrofts and TS Group have had a close relationship with Bankstone since 2005, acquiring a controlling interest in 2013.

The intervening years have seen both businesses grow from strength to strength. However, the recently implemented Civil Liability Bill has focused both parties on reviewing their respective objectives, and, as a consequence and for the parties’ mutual benefit, TS Group has taken the decision to sell its shareholding, leaving both parties free to work together in other ways.


Interesting times – 2020 in review

23/12/2020

What a year it’s been! Who could have guessed, as we staggered blearily into January 2020, that a nasty little virus bred of bats by way of pangolins would turn our whole world upside down. 

City centres emptied. People wore masks. Entire aisles of tinned food and loo roll mysteriously vanished from the supermarket shelves. Working from home was the interim normal. We all forgot what cash had been. Planes vanished from our skies. Tachometers had little to do. Birds sang. People clapped, sang, and banged cans. Deer, boar and goats roamed our roads at random. Stuff like that, basically.

Meanwhile, the world of insurance braced, like everyone else, for the shuddering impact of hazily defined Brexit opportunities. There was much talk of blue passports and green cards. There was a deal of fuss over whether businesses should be compensated by their insurers for having been interrupted by the pandemic – as all too many of them this year most certainly were.

The chronic uncertainty that’s so much a feature of life in the twenty-first century was massively amplified on multiple fronts by the BrexCovid syndrome, while Donald J Trump’s de facto abolition of the broad grouping of conventions, norms and expectations previously united under the banner of reality, somehow seeped over here, where one person’s truth became ever less distinguishable from another person’s fiction.

Humans joined soups, shoddy paint jobs, and sunburned skin in acquiring the ability to bubble (verb, intransitive). Furlough was another word that everyone starting using a lot. But furloughing wasn’t for everyone. Many, sadly, just lost their jobs. Insurance people duly girded their loins against the inevitable tide of excess risk associated with such times: more theft, more fraud, more dubious claims – all trends that tend to fuel claims inflation and with it the prospect of premium hikes – a not altogether unwelcome one for a motor insurance market in which rates have fallen markedly this year.

It’s been a year of expectations raised then dashed, again and again. If not yet fully stoical, we’re mostly resigned in a weary way to keeping in check our natural exuberance and patiently holding out of better times to come. Which surely they will. On which happy note, can we simply say: have as merry a Christmas as you possibly can, and the happiest new year achievable under the circumstances. Stay safe. Stay strong. Stay home if you can.


Relief at last for all those plagued by pain-in-the-neck whiplash claimants

23/12/2020

One of the undoubted highlights of next year (2020) is certain to be the long awaited culmination of HMG’s plans to prove once and for all that there’s no such thing as whiplash by removing any possible financial incentive for private citizens and their aiders and abetters in the so-called legal community to carry on pretending that there is.

Five years after reforms were first proposed, and a year on from the original implementation date, the Civil Liability Act will finally (almost certainly) come into force in April 2020. Its effect will be to slash the cash that those claiming whiplash can claim by as much as 90%. 

Naturally, there will be whingers. Only the other day, for instance, the Motor Accident Solicitors Society described the sensibly derisory tariffs adopted in the legislation as ‘fundamentally flawed, arbitrary and wholly unjust, contrived without any objectivity, logic or scrutiny.’ But what would you expect a bunch of lawyers to say!

In reality, of course, the tariffs are positively generous. Even supposing whiplash were a real thing and not a sham put up by malingering freeloaders, there’s a general recognition in UK society today that far too much fuss gets made about pain. We Brits didn’t get to be the masters of the world we are today (or was it yesterday?) by moaning on about a bit of neck gip – far less expecting a handout on the back of it.

Shaving a tad off the compensation potentially on offer for injuries lasting up to three months to slim it down from £2,250 to an altogether more proportionate £225 tempers prudence with charitable leniency. Nudging the potential award for injuries lasting up to six months down by just 85% to a perfectly adequate £450 looks equally sound. Such adjustments are surely both timely and equitable.

The numbers of those trying it on with trumped up neck-ache bellyaching are already plummeting as cervical injury bleaters recognise the ultimate futility of their pretence. Implementing the CLA should finally put these Moaning Minnies out of business – along with what’s left of all those legions of shameless solicitors who’ve wilfully egged them along into claiming so-called compensation.

Whiplash: faking it is literally this easy following a motor accident




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