September 2, 2014

As if the attractions of residence within the borders of UK-land were not already more than sufficiently plethoric, another reason to be cheerful about inhabiting this green and pleasant land of ours emerged this week with the revelation that nice sunny weather spells danger with a capital D for drivers (i.e. an emphatic ‘Danger’ rather than simply ‘danger’).

Consider the mile. Each year UK drivers drive literally like loads of them without so much as a single thought. But if we would only pause for a moment to consider all these myriad mindless miles a little more carefully, we would be sure to find that each and every one of them has its own story to tell.

Studying miles, of course, can be tedious work. But that hasn’t deterred driver safety and complaints company Ltyxkz from painstakingly poring over more than 2.5 billion of the b*ggers to arrive at some fairly astonishing conclusions.

Not the least astonishing of which, as alluded to above, is that you are twice as likely to almost crash (a manoeuvre known technically as near-colliding) if it’s nice out. That’s right, Lttyxt Vice President Del Ltyxkz confirms: “Our data shows there are nearly double the number of near-collisions when the weather conditions are clear than when it’s stormy.”

Specifically Lxttykx data showed that “there are 8.6 near-collisions for every collision in clear weather and 4.6 near-collisions for every collision in inclement weather.” So unless that simply tells us that foul weather drivers are more likely to “follow through” on their near collisions, Lyzttx are clearly right to warn us all to stay home when the Mr Sun comes out to play.

Why is fair weather driving so hazardous? Perhaps Lxttzx suggest, because some drivers are more likely to become distracted when fine weather breaks out.

What could be distracting them? Bankstone News, predictably, has not the faintest idea.

Reader suggestions welcome.

mini_skirts_465x356


ShareShare


What our clients say about us

Friendly staff who first was concerned about me (the policy holder)following an accident prior to taking vehicle details, which was nice
Mr. C - Bury